The Fageol Cruise Liner was an idea that ldquocame and wentrdquo in 1950 The ldquotrailerrdquo was produced by the Twin Coach Company Kent Ohio This vehicle appeared in an advertisement that claimed it to be up to 8000 lbs lighter and 10 ft shorter than a conventional tractor and semitrailer International Nickel Company supplied the 188 austenitic chromium stainless steel used in the body A diesel engine was mounted under the ldquocabrdquo From the book Truck by Trailer The History of the Truck Trailer Man

The Fageol Cruise Liner was an idea that “came and went” in 1950. The “trailer” was produced by the Twin Coach Company (Kent, Ohio). This vehicle appeared in an advertisement that claimed it to be up to 8,000 lbs. lighter and 10 ft. shorter than a conventional tractor and semi-trailer. International Nickel Company supplied the 18-8 austenitic chromium stainless steel used in the body. A diesel engine was mounted under the “cab.” (From the book, Truck by Trailer: The History of the Truck Trailer Manufacturing Industry)

New book highlights trailer history, importance

If you’re a Trailer-Body Builders reader, then the chances are good you’ll be interested in a new book by a long-time veteran of the business. Truck by Trailer: The History of the Truck Trailer Manufacturing Industry is being billed as the first book to recognize the truck trailer as a unique transportation vehicle. 

Written by John L. Conley—who spent 40 years with the trucking industry, including as editor of Modern Bulk Transporter magazine and with the trade association National Tank Truck Carriers Inc.—the book highlights the importance of the truck trailer as part of the celebration of the 75th Anniversary of the Truck Trailer Manufacturer’s Association.

After all, as the book details, the introduction of the truck trailer in the early 1900s revolutionized materials distribution much as had the first steamboats, railroad cars, airplanes, trucks, and intermodal shipping containers. And some of the same type of operational and regulatory challenges that faced trailer builders a century ago remain today.

But trailers proved their value during two world wars and those wartime experiences led to engineering and manufacturing advancements that long benefited commercial users. While methods and materials of trailer construction to serve expanding markets have changed over the years, the principle of providing the economy with a versatile and dependable tool for moving materials has remained unchanged.

Catch up on the complete history of the truck trailer industry by ordering Conley's book from the TTMA Online Store.

TAGS: News
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