OSHA rule addresses retaliation complaints

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration has published an interim final rule establishing procedures and time frames for handling employee retaliation complaints under the Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (MAP-21). OSHA invites the public to submit comments on the interim final rule.

MAP-21, enacted July 6, 2012, protects workers in automobile manufacturing, part supplies and car dealerships who have been discharged or otherwise retaliated against for providing information concerning motor vehicle defects or violations of motor vehicle safety standards to their employer or the Secretary of Transportation.

The interim final rule is effective March 16, 2016. Individuals may submit comments electronically at www.regulations.gov, the Federal eRulemaking Portal. Comments can also be submitted by mail or facsimile; for details, see the Federal Register notice. The deadline for comments is May 16, 2016.

OSHA’s fact sheet, Filing Whistleblower Complaints under the Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (MAP-21), provides additional details about the statute and interim final rule along with instructions on how to file a complaint with OSHA under MAP-21.

OSHA enforces the whistleblower provisions of MAP-21 and 21 other statutes protecting employees who report violations of various securities laws, trucking, airline, nuclear power, pipeline, environmental, rail, maritime, health care, workplace safety and health regulations, and consumer product safety laws. For more information, please visit www.whistleblowers.gov.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit www.osha.gov.

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