ATA Lauds Improvement in Truck Crash Rate

Officials with the American Trucking Associations expressed satisfaction with the release of new federal data showing a drop in the large truck-involved crash rates in 2013.

Officials with the American Trucking Associations expressed satisfaction with the release of new federal data showing a drop in the large truck-involved crash rates in 2013.

After the release of data from the Federal Highway Administration of estimated miles traveled by large trucks in 2013, ATA was able to calculate the large truck-involved crash fatality rate as 1.44 per 100 million miles traveled – a 1.6% decline from the 1.465 per 100 million miles traveled in 2012. With 2013’s decline, the fatality rate has plummeted 39.2% over the past decade. The injury rate saw a 34.2% decline over the past decade as well.

“The trucking industry’s efforts to improve safety on our highways are showing results,” said ATA President and CEO Bill Graves. “While there is still much work to do, we should feel good that because of the efforts of ATA and others in the industry, our highways are safer, even as our trucks deliver more goods all across our nation.”

ATA calculated the fatality and injury rates using the figure for truck miles traveled - 275,018,000,000 miles in 2013 according to FHWA – and the number of truck-involved fatalities and injuries – to calculate the rates.

“Safety isn’t just job one for trucking, its jobs one, two, and three,” said ATA Chairman Duane Long, chairman of Longistics, Raleigh, N.C. “The commitment that carriers like mine have made to ensure that not just our drivers, but everyone on the road arrives safely, is producing results.”

Just last week, ATA-member Werner Enterprises highlighted the industry’s impressive safety record, pointing out areas where the industry and the federal government could collaborate to do more to reduce crashes (click here for more: http://www.trucking.org/article.aspx?uid=a831ae6c-e37f-4ed1-9d97-6619f9a12d0b).

 

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